Monthly Archives: March 2011

Dish this!

 

Sliding, sloping, and slightly off centered, with hills and holes adding rhythm and rhyme, this dish rocks.

Indoors or out, this dish is suitable as a tabletop centerpiece or as a focal point, raised on a pedestal, in a shady nook of the garden.

When I first met this dish, I mistook the wood’s growth rings as striations in stone.  I was even more intrigued, when talking to David Spain, co-owner of Moss and Stone Gardens, to learn the container was purchased from a local import store.  “I was inspired by the many contours which are so helpful in transplanting colonies to a new location,” said David.

Indeed, David Spain’s trademark, in my opinion, is his use of the cracks and crevices.  No opening is spared from being filled with soft, seductive green.

“For this dish,” David says, “I chose a uniform and lush palette, using a dominate application of Campylopus introflexus, for its radiant deep green color and sheen.”

The acrocarpus moss, Campylopus introflexus, can be grown in sun or shade, keeping it’s sheen, whether moist or dry.

Another acrocarpus moss used in this creation, is the charming chartreuse colored, Dicranum scoparium’s, adding depth to the design.

Also used in the design is pluerocarp moss Bryandersonia illecebra, a native moss, common to the Piedmont area of North Carolina.

Other plants in the dish design include the fern, Asplenium platyneuron, and mosses, Hypnum and Ceratadon purpureus.

While I like the idea of walking the woods to find a relic to create moss dishes, I’m also comforted to know  wonderful teak root “containers” are available for purchase, satisfying my need for immediate gratification.

I’ll keep this dish design in mind, when I’m out and about, shopping my favorite haunts.

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest
 

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Country dish

Marrying moss with stone is the perfect match, but when moss is coupled with pottery, it becomes a creative pairing.

That’s exactly what happened, when David Spain of Moss and Stone Gardens collaborated with Marsha Owen, of Marsha Owen Pottery, to design stoneware containers for various  bryophytes.

Meeting David’s exacting specifications for profile and drainage, holes are included in this dish so water is quickly whisked away. David’s vision was to create a low profile piece, “To be in proportion to the bryophyte’s low profile plantings and minimal soil requirements,” says David.

Measuring a mere six inches long, this Marsha Owen oval pottery container, allows for a Lilliputian dish that begs to be picked up and held.

David’s selection of bryophytes included Parmelia and Cladonia rangiferina lichens and Cladonia rangiferina, Campylopus introflexus, Dicranum scoparium mosses.  The fern, Asplenium platyneuron, was also used as an added element to the design.

“My goal here was to compliment the beautiful cream glaze of Marsha’s pottery and to use as much diversity as I could for this very small vessel without becoming too busy,” says David.

The design offers the perfect pairing of the lichen’s pale colors, complementing the pottery and the vibrant glossy greens for contrast.

Perfect for a tabletop setting where it can admire up close and personal.

 

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest
 

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Moss and fern burl art

Time twisted, rounded, knotty growth, creates the base of this root burl, moss and fern planter.  Crevices and craters cover this found relic of an old oak tree, inviting moss and ferns to creep deep within.

David Spain, co-owner of Moss and Stone Gardens , created this moss art.  When talking with David about this piece, he says, “One of my favorite mediums for mosses is wood, and finding an interesting relic from a tree is pure gold.”

As you can imagine, these beautiful burl’s can be difficult to find but David’s dedication to moss art calls him to the woods in search of decaying tree parts.  According to David, “The trick is finding a burl root, or the heart of a decaying tree that is much denser than normal branches. They are often what’s left lying on the ground after the softer parts of the tree has decayed over decades.

The uniqueness of each piece of burl was made from exposure to the natural elements.  “These burls are similar to driftwood but have been developed by erosion and insects instead of wave action,” says David.

When David created this moss piece, his vision was to create what might be found in nature.  His goal was to create a piece, “Perfect to seamlessly blend with a native garden  or to bring indoors as a natural accent to a more formal setting.”

Moss and fern species to create this planter included, the acrocarpus mosses, Dicranum scoparium and Campylopus introflexus, and the pluerocarp mosses Hypnum cuppressiform and Entodon seductrix. Ebony spleenwort fern,  Asplenium platyneuron, also lays softly against the aged wood.

Prior to planting, the wood required no special treatment other than a strong spray wash with water to remove any loose material.

When David created this piece of moss art and in keeping with his unique style, he inoculated tiny colonies within the crevices and craters, to, as he says, “Jump start their natural spread over time.”

Now with added purpose, as I hike my woods, I will be keeping a keen eye to the ground in hopes of finding a piece of burl to build similar art of my own.

 

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest
 

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.