Monthly Archives: January 2012

Moss, an Orchid, and Marsha Owen’s pottery

 

Phalaenopsis blooms rise high above a commissioned pottery piece by Marsha Owen.  A beautiful work of art that can be used inside as a centerpiece on the dining room table or in the foyer as a fresh welcome home. Set this dish garden next to the bed for a soothing sight while waiting for the light to wane from evening to night.  During the warm summer months, this moss and orchid dish garden could be admired outdoors.

David Spain wanted an orchid container that used moss as  a living plant not as a dried up, deceased, dressing.  David explains, “Paired with orchids, moss is treated most often as a mulch not as a living plant.  Wanting to combine moss and an orchid as living species, I was inspired to create a container that allowed the two to be displayed together, but with both kept alive.”

David’s clever design is a ring to combine a living moss dish garden with an orchid (or another plant); one that possess  separate containers, allowing for different watering and soil conditions.

When designing your orchid container, considering adding live mulch to keep the composition fresh and alive.

 

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

David Spain in Country Gardens magazine

 

Our very own, David Spain co-owner of Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks  is featured in the most recent issue — early spring — of  Country Gardens magazine.  We featured the photo shoot back in May; today, the story is nestled among many other truly unique and wonderful stories in one of America’s most loved magazine.

The story is titled:  As Green as it Gets, by moi,

Raised high in a pedestal dish or lowered into the depths of an old oak log, a moss dish garden lets you admire a lilliputian landscape at close range.  David Spain, co-owner of Moss and Stone Gardens in Raleigh, creates these verdant little landscapes in various vessels. ….

The story also includes an in-depth how-to for making your own dish gardens at home.  I hope you pick up your copy today.  When yours arrives in the mail, carve out some time and settle in for a good, long read.

 

 

 

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Moss Rocks! will rock Duke — David Spain — A Garden of Moss

David Spain will be speaking to the Durham Garden Forum, an informal group that meets monthly to enrich the members’ gardening knowledge and skill.  January’s topic: “A Garden of Moss,” with David Spain of Moss and Stone Gardens. With 10 years of experience cultivating moss and creating gardens, David will share his expertise on moss culture and design strategies. Contact Durham Garden Forum at durhamgardenforum@gmail.com. Parking is free after 5 p.m.

Hope you can make it!

Speaker:  David Spain

Sponsor:  Sarah P. Duke GardensLocation:  Sarah P. Duke Gardens - Map
Cost:  Free for forum members; $10 general public. Annual membership fee $25.
When:   to 
Contact:  Smith, Sara
Email:  slsmith@duke.edu
Phone:  919-668-1707

 

 

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Earthworm castings on moss

Dear David Spain,

I have been encouraging moss in my backyard and following your tips for a regular watering schedule. I can really see a big difference in the growth of the moss since I started and we are getting very excited with the results. The trouble is that there’s often many earthworm castings on the surface that are an eyesore and difficult to remove. What do you recommend to deal with this annoying problem. Thank you in advance for your help.

James

 


Dear James,

You are not alone in this problem. The reason that earthworms sometimes leave behind their castings above the surface is a direct correlation to the amount of moisture in the soil.  As the soil becomes saturated with water the worms will migrate towards the top layer of soil. The cure is to reduce watering volume, ensuring the ground does not become saturated. If you are using a sprinkler system, adjust it’s settings to reduce the run time or frequency. Light and frequent waterings are beneficial for moss growth but watering too much is only a waste of water and can promote other problems such as earthworm castings or slime molds.

There are a couple of techniques to remove the worm castings after they appear. One is to let them dry out completely, this will allow you to crumble the castings without causing a mud cake on top of the moss. Another is to use a knife to slice off the tower of the casting pile and discard, moisten the remaining casting and allow it to soften, then using a pump sprayer, concentrate a jet stream directly on to the pile and dissolve it. Using a sprayer instead of a water hose will minimize the amount of water needed to dissolve the small spot without saturating the ground and beginning the cycle all over again.

Creating the proper conditions for moss growth is a balancing act. We can create an environment that will allow moss to grow at an increased rate, but we must be careful to not create the conditions for undesirable side effects.  Happy mossgardening.

David Spain, a.k.a. Moss Rock

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Cobble’s writer gets her first Moss Rock!

Hi Helen here. Consider this story Moss and Stone Garden’s — Where Moss Rocks! first guest blogger post. Even though I write a post weekly, this is the first time I’ve written about my personal experience with moss. Moss Rocks!

Alone each week, I sit to script a post and share the wonders of Moss Rocks! Each week, for nearly a year now, I’ve watched millions visit this blog and Moss and Stone Garden’s website to read, purchase Moss Rocks!, and yes, as many have suggested, to question my sanity. But, hey, Moss Rocks! rock. It’s easy to go crazy around those little cuties. However, just like the shoemaker’s wife, I’m the Cobble’s writer. Everyone around me has Pebbles, Cobbles, and Boulders. But I had none. I had to live vicariously though my tales about Moss Rocks! Until now. Santa was good to me. He brought me Moss Rocks!

Now, as I sit writing in the rising light, I’ll never again be alone. My Moss Rocks! will always be by my side. When I’m watching the kids kick the soccer ball in the back garden of Helen’s Haven, I can bring Moss Rocks! with me to cheer them on. This year, when I go to Florida, Moss Rocks! will ride shotgun, telling me mossome tales. I never tire hearing about how he came to be. He tells the story so well.

When I go for a picnic, Moss Rocks! will be by my side, helping wick away the dew. He will offer me solace, when I’m feeling blue. Moss Rocks! will comfort my kitty when the load of the world weights heavy on his shoulders. Something that can only be fixed with a Boulder. Yes, I will share my Moss Rocks! with those I love. As long as you remember, love me, love my Moss Rocks! When I’m invited for a day with you, please remember, I’ll bring him too.

I struggled with a name to best suit his personality, but then it came to me:  Galanthus. Like the flower, Galanthus brings me brightness whenever there is darkness around me.

Please share with me what you and your Moss Rocks! have been up too. I’m always looking for ideas to spend time with Galanthus. Feel free to post here or on Moss and Stone Gardens’ Facebook page. If looking for a play date, text me. ;~\

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest
 

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Photo credited obviously NOT Ken Gergle.