Tag Archives: gardening

Moss and ant mounds

Dear David,

Ant hills are taking over my moss lawn…is there a safe way to remedy this problem? It seems to be breaking up the moss and leaving spotty areas of sand. It has taken several years to fill and I hate to see it destroyed with ant hills.

So glad to find your website!
Michelle

Dear Michelle,

Congratulations on your moss lawn success! Your ant mound problem may be easy to remedy depending on the scale of the ant population and their activity in the area.

In my experience, ants will usually move their mounds out of an area where they are disturbed regularly. If you frequently water down the mounds, the ants will likely relocate to an area with less disturbance. If this doesn’t suit your needs or you wish to eliminate ants from an area without damaging your moss or using harsh chemical control, I suggest using diatomaceous earth. An ant mound is used as an entry or exit path from the colony below the surface–sprinkling diatomaceous earth around the mound and into the opening will aggravate the ants and deter them from that area without harming the moss.

I have heard of cinnamon or cloves also having an aggravating effect, so that may also be worth a try. Good luck and let me know how you fare.

David Spain a.k.a. Moss Rock

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Moss Rocks!’s David Spain on GardenLine Radio with C.L. Fornari


The ever enthusiastic moss man, David Spain recently talked moss with  gardening enthusiast, C.L. Fornari on  Gardenline,  It was mossome!  Check it out.

C.L.’s interview probed moss in general, plus  how Moss Rocks! came to be.

 

 

 

David Spain is a passionate moss expert, pioneering moss cultivation, working to educate gardeners of the perils of wild harvesting of mosses and to, instead, help them develop sustainable propagation techniques.

Did you know Moss Rocks! is a home decor item using a specialized ceramic container, with a patent pending design to maintain and display Dicranum mosses? The use of Dicranum moss makes this gift item uniquely suited for low maintenance care, indoors and out.

For more on moss education, listen in by clicking below  

 

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Growing moss between stepping stones

Dear David, a.k.a. Moss Rock,

How do I get moss to grow between the stepping stones. I have flagstone. I have shaded it from about 60% of the sun, watered it regularly and added sulfur to the soil. I get a little moss and some lichen, but I want more moss.  And what do you suggest for zone 8?

Jenn

Dear Jenn,

The secret is out, growing moss takes only watering. Mosses are extremely drought tolerant, so they don’t need water to survive, but they do need water to grow. Mosses only perform photosynthesis when they are hydrated, otherwise they happily remain dormant until moisture returns.

The key to establishing moss anywhere is to water.  As to how much and when, see our blog post on watering mosses.

Look for pluerocarp mosses and transplant between the stones, then water until they fill in, that’s it! If you don’t know your pluerocarp from your acrocarp see our blog post.

Pay attention to your sunlight conditions and look for mosses growing in the same exposure to better your success, collect different species and mix them to further ensure one species will like the conditions.

A note about moss between close set stones, this tends to be an area where drying out occurs quickly, so watering techniques are most critical, so keep ‘em moist, but don’t drown! Good luck and send us pics of your success!

P.S. The photo used in this post was taken at the Moss Farm and while this is the extreme when thinking of planting moss between flagstone, we used the photo to show off…I mean to show a point.  We like doing moss in a big way.  Use more moss, less flagstone.  ~Helen

Words: Helen  Yoest



Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

 

 

 

Moss, maple, mortar

The pairing of moss and maples melds together like moss on moist.  This antique Japanese teak rice mortar, inspired David Spain to go with the placement of a Japanese maple, nestled deep in the mortar base.  As David explains,  When I found this 100+ year old teak mortar, I knew it was going to make a very special moss container. The rot resistant teak wood is perfect for a long lasting and compatible material for mosses.

The placement of the Japanese maple, suited this piece nicely, With a piece of this size, adding a larger plant for height interest was possible, so I headed out to the Japanese maple tree farm.  After selecting a couple of specimens, with appropriately sized root balls, I chose this Acer palmatum ‘Toyama Nishiki’, says David.

Pleased with the pairing of the mortar and maple, David then chose three moss rocks, of appropriate scale, and placed them in the shadow of the developing bows of the cascading maple.  Then David added three Ebony spleenworts (Asplenium platyneuron) to balance the plateau offered by the unique shape of the mortar.

Several varieties of moss were added to suggest a miniature scape completeing the vignette.  Campylopus introflexus, Anomodon attenuatus, Anomodon rostratus, Leucobryum glaucum and a little Dicranum scoparium seemed to fit the venue, arranged with pleurocarps on one side and acrocarps on the other.

To finish off the design, David, Tucked and seeded mosses in the pockets and crags of the gracefully aging teak, giving them a head start on their inevitable pairing.

 

Moss Rocks! will be available in October.  Sign up today so you can be notified when Moss Rocks! are available for purchase.  Moss Rocks! will be sold through Independent Garden Centers and on-line including our own site, where we will also carry other moss-related products.

Until then, think moss.  Moss Rocks!

Words: Helen  Yoest



Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Long, cool Moss Rocks!

Sitting alone along the windowsill, Moss Rocks!™ watches beauty all around her from the security of the indoors.  No squirrel is likely to scratch her sporophytes today.

The Toadstool color of this Cobble-sized Moss Rocks!, complements the honey color of the natural wood grain wonderfully.  A perfect resting spot for Moss Rocks!

It took David Spain co-owner of Moss and Stone Gardens — Where Moss Rocks! 2 years to bring Moss Rocks! to market.  During this time, he addressed issues of shipping, color, shape and style; but more importantly, David researched the best moss for use indoors.

Never before has a living moss product, with a suitable container, designed solely for sustaining and displaying such a beautiful species of moss, been developed and available for easy care and transport. ~David Spain


It all came together at the first of this year and will be offered to you in October.  Every home, whether in the arid Southwest or the frigid Northwest can have their own little moss garden, inside or out; from your desk to your deck.

Come check us out and tell us how you display your Moss Rocks!

 

AVAILABLE  October, 2011

MOSS ROCKS! Ordering Info

 

 

Words: Helen  Yoest



Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Moss Rocks! ROCKED the IGC Show in Chicago

After 450 million years in the making, 2 years in development, a patent pending, and an infinite number of ideas flowing, stirring up juices like one might find in a frothy river, Moss and Stone Gardens — Where Moss Rocks! launched their first moss dish garden to an eager group of buyers.  Moss Rocks! are the ultimate moss dish gardens.

Yes, we sell Moss Rocks!, but we are, first and foremost, about moss education. ~ David Spain, co-owner of Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

If you are social media savvy, and I trust you are if you are reading this blog post, you probably heard about the Moss Rocks! launch.  If you didn’t, you must have been hiding under a moss rock of another kind.  Moss Rocks! are all the buzz.  It’s only been a week and a day since the launch, and yet we have created quite the stir.  We should celebrate, with a refreshing toddy, on the rocks of course, but we haven’t had enough time for that. Soon, we hope.

Orders were taken from Maine to California; from Florida to Washington. The buzz of a whole new product hitting the market, one that is also hot and hip, AND one that can meet fourth quarter sales, got buyers wanting to meet the demand Moss Rocks! will bring.  Many were anxious to be one of the first to carry Moss Rocks!  It’s all good.  It’s a moss thing. Moss Rocks! will be available to purchase mid October, both in garden centers and on-line.

Please visit the yellow link below, Moss Rocks! Ordering Info, to sign up for notification of when they’re available.  For IGCs, click on the retail section, of the same form, to order wholesale on-line.

AVAILABLE Mid October

MOSS ROCKS! Ordering Info

Attending the Independent Garden Center show in Chicago was a mossium experience. David Spain was able to put faces to the names of so many people he met on-line through introductions from Helen Yoest, Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! marketing strategists with Gardening With Confidence. (That’s me ;~\.)

Even though we will be busy selling Moss Rocks!, we will stay close to our mission of moss education.  Our blog will continue to communicate about moss, moss dish gardens, and moss Q & A. ~David Spain, co-owner, Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

Soon, Moss Rocks! will be rockin’ the Nation’s home and gardens, from the desk to the deck.  The moss used in Moss Rocks! was selected specifically for indoor use.  All moss naturally grows outside, given the right conditions,  but not all mosses thrive indoors.  Ours will; making Moss Rocks! adorable indoor decor.

Once Moss Rocks! are sitting on your desk or deck, we hope to hear from YOU.  Tell us how you use your Moss Rocks!  Send photos!  We will even highlight Moss Rocks! travel journeys. When you take your Moss Rock on vaca, send us photos.  Although you don’t have to bring them along, you may find you want too.  If so, don’t deny yourself.  It really is fun to hug your rocks each and every day.  So, please sign up so we can keep you in the loop of when and where Moss Rocks! are rolling…

Here’s some of the buzz we heard at IGC…  

 

Simply put, P. Allen Smith says of MossRocks!, “I love them.”  Indeed he does, he didn’t want to part with this Moss Rock!  It won’t be much longer, Allen, and your Moss Rocks! will be ready!

William Moss “Met David Spain this week at IGC (gardening and landscaping trade show). Check out the cool photos. He’s grows bryophytes and knows what I known for years: MOSS ROCKS!”

 

 

 

 

Shirley Bovshow with Garden Center  TV  Garden media enthusiast Shirley Bovshow says, “Chia Pets has nothing on this easy to care for and most importantly, stylish moss container. It’s more than that. Moss Rocks! is an elegant cradle for one of the plant world’s most alluring plants.”

 

Gardenwise with Arlena TV  Sweet Arlena filmed Moss Rocks! with this to say about Moss Rocks!, “MOSS ROCKS!!!  When I first saw the New Moss Rocks all I could do is feel Happy…they are  the Newest Cool thing!…Colorful, Calming and Modern all in one…You need 3 or 5 and they are the perfect gift for all  my gardening friends!!!

Bren Haas, Helen Yoest, David Spain, Mike Nowak. Photo Credit: Christopher Tidrick

 

 

Mike Nowak Show Yes, even Mike liked Moss Rocks!  And why not?  Organic is what Mike is all about and moss is the original organic.

Pebble power!

   Here’s more of what other’s are saying…

 There’s a reason why everyone is talking about Moss Rocks. The combination of the serenity of moss and the smooth simplicity of the porcelain “rock” makes them perfect for almost any space. They can be put in the garden for an unexpected surprise, displayed on a patio table or used indoors to decorate any room in the house. I predict that Moss Rocks are going to show up everywhere, from your neighbor’s garden to the hottest shelter magazine.  

~ Erin Schanen, author of the The Impatient Gardener.

 Bren Haas, author of BG Garden and #gardenchat, says ”A stylish piece of art by God from the garden  that you can keep in your interior landscape. I’m loving how it looks like it would be complicated to keep green and yet it is one of the easiest specimens to keep healthy in your home.  I can’t wait to see these in the independent garden centers in 2012!”

Annie Haven with Authentic Haven Brand, Moo Poo Tea, says,  ”I can’t wait to get my Moss Rocks here at the ranch I want one of each so I can have my own little Moss family <|;-)”

Pam Penick, author of Digging, says ”How pretty and fun! After all the moss in Seattle, you’ll be able to sell oodles to the Flingers, I bet. ;-)

Chris Sabbarese with Corona Tools says, ”If the Pet Rock met a Chia Pet, this would be their love child…Moss Rocks!”

Janit C, author of Two Green Thumbs, says “LOVE the new Moss Rocks!  Mini gardens unt themselves & cute as a button.  Wonderful colors fit into anywhere – inside or out!

Christopher Tidrick, From the Soil says, “Moss Rocks are one of the coolest new garden products I’ve seen in a long time. In a market where gift plants tend to be short-lived, these new moss mini-gardens promise to be chic, long-lasting and easy to grow. They’re the perfect living gift, even for non-gardeners.”

Bruce Bailey, Where Plants Rock says, “A hip and refreshing take on bringing the cool outdoors inside.  Table arrangements, hip bathroom, even putting place cards on the dining table. Moss is in and Moss Rocks is the hippest home item on the market.”

Katie Elzer-Peters, of Words says, “Moss Rocks really Rock! and they are Affordable, attractive indoor/outdoor decor.”

Seed Keeper says, “You gents are fun!  Love your new idea!”

Barbara Pintozzi, author of McGregor’s Daughter says, “Moss Rocks not only look great, they feel great.”

Mary Ann Newcomer, author of Gardens of the Wild, Wild West, says “ Cute little buggers and everybody ought to have a handful. AND, they make great gifts!”

Erin, The Impatient Gardener says , “Can’t wait for them. So cool!”

Kathy Linton says, “Displaying of the green I say! Who wouldn’t like a little moss garden to brighten up their home or office? And, it’s great for folks that are a tad busy.”

Jenny Koester says,  I LOVE these! I can think of a few prime spots to add a little green to my home and office :-)

Wendy Rebman Bredensteiner, says  ”Saw these in Chicago at the IGC. As cool as they appear! Imagine them on a teacher’s desk, in a college students dorm, an office cubicle. Want a little green that is easy to keep and hard to kill (and NOT artifical)? Will be ordering some of these for our store!”

Babs Hall, says ”Totally agree. Our daughters both have their first apartments — they saw these on the website and said Oh we WANT…. :O)”

Laura King Smith says, ”Just simplcistic beauty!!! Love it!”

Beyond My Garden says, “How wonderfully cute!”

Growing Herbs For Beginners says, “LOVE”

Angie Walls says, “These are completely awesome and you should do very well.”

Dirt & Martinis says, “Aren’t they adorable?”

Petie Reed says, “Beautiful!”

Anne of Green Gardens says, “Dang! I don’t think I can wait. I want to order some ASAP!!”

Jennifer Hammer says, “Those are so cute! Want!”

Sonya Reasor says, “Really like those.”

Carrie Zamorano says, “LOVE these!”
Patsybell says, “What is it about moss rocks? They always make me feel cool and relaxed. They are a great focal point for meditation.”

Words: Helen  Yoest  

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com. Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

The truth about moss – dispelling moss myths

Moss misconceptions abound.   Is it true a rolling stone gathers no moss? To better understand moss, I asked David Spain with Moss and Stone Gardens, Raleigh, NC, to enlighten us with the truth about mosses, dispelling many common moss myths.

 

Moss prefers acidic or nutrient poor soils. True or False?

False -Most mosses are not particular about the pH or nutrients of the substrates on which they grow.

 

It would be more accurate to understand that mosses thrive where there is little or no competition, which often occurs in acidic and poor, compacted soils, or for that matter, on stone.

Moss only grows in the shade. True or False?

False -Mosses have the greatest range of light exposure than any other land plant.

This doesn’t mean that all mosses can tolerate sun, only certain species can. Mosses are found growing in all climates and exposures, from full blazing desert sun, to almost undetectable amounts of light found in caves. Mosses can also be found on all 7 continents.


Moss only grows on the north side of trees. True and False?

False – Moss does grow on the north side of trees, and it also grows on the south, east, and west sides of trees, as well.

Moss may grow only on a north side of a tree if that’s the shadiest location as the sun tracks the sky. If there is something else providing shade (or moisture), the moss will grow in those places just as well.

 


Moss will invade my garden if I am growing moss on my property. True or False?

False – Moss spores are everywhere, even if there aren’t any mosses on your property. The spores travel on the wind to extreme distances, therefore proximity doesn’t mean density.

Moss will grow anywhere the conditions are appropriate for successful germination and can develop into a mature plant.

You can convert your moss-infested lawn into a moss lawn by letting nature take it’s course. True or False?

False - This is very unlikely to happen satisfactorily without intervention.

In most regions, the conditions necessary for moss to dominate vascular plants isn’t adequate. For example, in rain forests or areas like the Pacific Northwest, moss can over grow the under brush of existing plants; the abundant moisture gives the moss enough growing potential that it can blanket everything.

For other regions, something else needs to tip the scale in favor of the mosses, like abundant moisture, in this case I am referring to irrigation by man. To be more specific, one would have to water the moss lightly throughout the day in order to give it maximum growth potential, but not enough to give the existing plants (grasses, weeds) enough to sustain themselves.

Moss needs to be kept moist. True or False?

False – Despite this common impression, moss is actually one of the most drought tolerant plants. Also, there are a number of species that need regular periods of dryness to survive.

Mosses need moisture to reproduce sexually, but not asexually. Water is needed for photosynthesis, but not for survival. Moist areas allow for faster growth, but isn’t necessary for existence. Acrocarps mosses tend to be more drought tolerant than Pleurocarps.

 

Spreading or spraying diluted yogurt, buttermilk, beer, or manure tea will promote moss to grow. True or False?

False -The key here is not what substance will create moss in an area, but what allows moss to develop. The most important things to allow mosses to develop are moisture and lack of competition. Competition can be other plants, debris, or loose and irregular surfaces. Moisture is always needed to begin moss establishment. When mosses are beginning to colonize in an area, moisture is what allows the young mosses to perform photosynthesis, which in turn allows for growth.

Leaf litter, pine straw, twigs, loose stones, and such, make it harder for moss to find a stable substrate on which to attach. Moss prefers to have direct contact with whatever it is spreading onto; therefore, a smooth substrate will allow the mosses easier contact.

Mosses do not draw nutrients or sustenance from the substrates they are attached too; therefore, anything you apply to the substrate is not utilized by the moss since it does not have the root structure necessary to benefit from such applications.

Blending moss and buttermilk into a slurry is the best way to grow moss. True or False?

False -Although widely reported to work effectively, this technique is usually met with failure and a moldy mess.

The best way to grow moss is by division of a colony or fragmentation, buttermilk is not needed.

 

 

 

Moss spores will add to my seasonal allergies. True or False?

False -Moss spores may be as common as mold spores or pollen at times, but they are generally non-allergenic.

You can be allergic to anything, but the likelihood that moss or it’s spores will give you allergies, is extremely low.

If you walk on moss, it will die.  True or False?

False – Most mosses tolerate foot traffic, but it’s a question of how much foot traffic?

As a non vascular system, mosses don’t need protection from being compressed. With some foot traffic, their cellulose remains flexible, allowing mosses to be compressed without the kind of damage that occurs when vascular plants are trod on. The key difference is that their flexible structure and small scale are susceptible to breaking, if stretched. As such, walking flat-footed is greatly tolerated, while running or shuffling isn’t.

Moss is a parasitic plant. True or False?

False – When moss grows on trees, wood, or shingles, moss does not feed on the material it attaches to.

Mosses may keep substrates they are growing on damp for longer periods of time, and thus, this moisture retention is capable of deteriorating some non-living materials.

If you have moss growing on your property it means you also have molds. True or False?

False – The misconception that moss and molds are related isn’t true. Moss and molds are rarely found together, except when molds are attacking the moss as they might anything organic. With molds present, moss dies or decays, as does most anything else it attacks. If you have heathy moss, you do not have mold.


Spanish moss, Reindeer moss, club moss, sea moss, Irish moss and Scotch moss belong to the Phylum of Bryophyta. True or False?

False – Including moss in the common name, does not mean it’s a true moss.

Spanish moss is an epiphyte, Reindeer moss is a lichen,club moss is a lycophyte, sea moss is an algae, Irish and Scotch mosses are vascular plants that look similar to mosses.

Growing moss is beneficial to my garden.  True or False?

True - Moss is a beneficial addition to the garden in many ways: it retains moisture content, similar to mulching, it is superior to mulches in that it is a living layer that processes nutrients and contributes organic material, it does not become compacted, and doesn’t need replacing annually, and it provides a healthy habitat for beneficial insects and promotes the evolutionary symbiosis of
mycelium
and plant roots.


Moss attracts ticks, fleas, and mosquitos. True or False?

False – Ticks prefer tall plants, where they can perch to better position themselves to catch a ride on their next meal. Fleas don’t dwell in moss, and mosquitos need plants to provide shelter from wind and sun. Mosses are too short and dense to support resting mosquitos.

 

 

And finally, I needed to know –

A rolling stone gathers no moss. True or False?

True – A rolling stone gathers no moss. If the stone is rolling, moss grows to slowly to get started on it and the friction of rolling would abrade or wear off any mosses that were on it.

 

 

 

 

There you have it! If you want to learn a truth about moss missed here, let us know!

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

苔と一緒に家で — At home with moss

Welcome to my home away from home.  Come, leave your cares at the steps; go west then north.  Tiny your size and imagine how clever I can be with moss as my muse.  Imagine, how savvy you will be, once mellowed by moss.

After our minds have synced, we can roll down the hill for the pleasure of doing so or just travel from moss to moss.  We can write poetry at Campylopus introflexus, doodle near Leucobryum glaucum, and perhaps share a kiss at Anomodon rostratus. If we have time, we can picnic under the western red cedar and pretend our day just began.  At the end of our time together, we can rest and reflect at Brachythecium rutabulum.

Leave your e-world at the foot of the blue dish.  It is not welcomed here.  Bring with you only your infancy — the  life before the world charged you.  You don’t know how?  You will, with the first step.  Let moss give you energy; let moss recharge you, preparing you for life’s re-entry.  It all starts with the first step.

David Spain’s inspiration for this moss dish began with a miniature aquarium decoration of a Japanese structure.  ”I wanted to design my

version of a fairy/miniature landscape using mosses.”

Using flakes of Tennessee flagstone, stacked and glued, with a gravel pathway of course sand, David ‘s design is sure to spur fantasies of your own.  Where does your imagination take you?

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest
 

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Moss melts a hardened heart

At the dawn of spring, dainty sporophytes form after a sexual encounter of a moss kind.  The lens captures what few will see; unless, of course, you are one of the chosen ones — chosen to grow moss, because you can.

Our old dish garden friend Mellow Yellow, sports sporohytes, ready to spew forth spores, allowing the moss to dance in the circle of life.

Imagine minute fields of sporohytes blowing their weight in the wind soon releasing the next generation of spores.  With this inch, you grow smiles.  Imagine, too, lightly touching the tops of these sporohytes, feeling the energy of the next generation.

Perhaps this picture of Polytrichum commune, will instill a desire in you; actually growing this moss, no doubt, will make a believer out of you.  Moss melts a hardened heart.

This moisture loving moss, Polytrichum commune, will acclimated to many shade and soil types.  Dished up, like we did with Mellow Yellow, it becomes a moveable feast.

Has moss melted your heart lately?

Moss and Stone Gardens’ photos are brought to you by Ken Gergle, with the following specs:

Camera – Nikon D3S

125 sec at f/4.0

Nikon 105mm f 2.8 lens (micro)

ISO 200

 

Order your Moss Rocks!  online today.  Moss is grand.  Moss is green.  Moss is good. Make the most of it; order Moss Rocks! today.

By: Helen Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to Ken Gergle.

Undulating waves

Ends curl along the pottery’s edge, as if lapping the rise and fall of the ocean’s water, Marsha Owens Pottery provides a fluid vessel for moss to float.

Mounting, moss species of acrocarps Dicranum scoparium, Campylopus introflexus and Luecobryum glaucum, mesh well with small stemmed pleurocarpous moss, Bryoandersonia illecebra, where over time, the pleurocarp will intermingle with the acrocarps. Further adding texture to the scene, are the likes of Parmelia lichen and Cladonia cristatella, remaining moist nestled with the mosses.

A mere eight inches at the widest point, this low profile planter is the perfect scale for many mosses. Designed for shade, this dish garden mixes shades of green and interesting textures for visual impact, creating an oasis in a dandy dish.

Homed indoors or out, this dish will have you searching a prominent shady spot in your garden or on your desk for easy admiration.

Photographed by Ken Gergle.

By: Helen  Yoest

Follow Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks! on Twitter @Moss_Rocks and our Facebook Like page Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!

To learn more about Moss and Stone Gardens – Where Moss Rocks!, please visit our website.  Or email David Spain at info@mossandstonegardens.com.

Unless otherwise noted, all photo are credited to KenGergle.